Charges Filed Against Haredi Man Who Systematically Abused Children Over 11 Years After years of abusing young boys and girls in Bnai Brak, Modi’in Elit and Jerusalem, a 32-year-old Kollel student has been charged for his crimes, according to the ‘Bchedri Charedim’ news site. The case was built on various types of evidence, including security footage, DNA tests, and the testimony of witnesses and victims, as well […]

Charges Filed Against Haredi Man Who Systematically Abused Children Over 11 Years

After years of abusing young boys and girls in Bnai Brak, Modi’in Elit and Jerusalem, a 32-year-old Kollel student has been charged for his crimes, according to the ‘Bchedri Charedim’ news site. The case was built on various types of evidence, including security footage, DNA tests, and the testimony of witnesses and victims, as well as confessions by the suspect to several of the accusations. He also confessed to additional crimes other than those mentioned in the indictment, but no further evidence has been found to corroborate those events.

 

The investigation began after an attack on an eight-year-old girl in Bnei Brak around last Purim. After the attack, the girl told her parents, and her father tracked down security footage of the suspect, who was taken in for questioning. However, as it was impossible to identify the suspect conclusively from the tape, he was released after giving a DNA sample and fingerprints. It can take months for DNA kits to be tested at the police lab, but when the sample was finally checked, it matched two other open abuse cases: the sexual abuse of a five-year-old boy in April 2007 and abuse of a six-year-old girl in May 2014. In July 2017, the suspect was brought in for further questioning, where he confessed to three more crimes. However, evidence was found for only two of the incidents; one in Modi’in Elit in September 2007 and one in Bnei Brak in May 2014.

 

 

Two weeks later, Tel Aviv District Attorney Sarit Aronov filed an indictment against the accused for three of the allegations. She also requested that the man be kept in custody until the end of the proceedings, on the grounds that he continued to pose a danger to the public because he operated systematically and, according to his own testimony, continued to abuse children even after seeking treatment.

 

The incident in April 2007 took place in Jerusalem. A five-year-old boy went outside to play on a Shabbat afternoon. The suspect caught the boy in the stairwell of his apartment building where he abused the boy and left behind DNA evidence. He warned the boy not to tell anyone about what had happened and disappeared from the scene. The boy’s parents filed charges and the boy gave police a detailed description of the suspect.

 

Five months later, the suspect abused a six-year-old girl in Modi’in Elit. The girl was playing outside of her apartment building when the suspect found her and led her to the building’s storage units, where he savagely abused her. Again, the girl’s parents filed a complaint with the police. The mother told officers that the suspect had returned to the building several days after the attack with a flimsy cover story at which point the girl identified the man to her parents. Her father then followed the suspect and was able to identify him as M from Bnei Brak. The police then followed up with a member of the local “Tznius police”, who was able to confirm the suspect’s identity and told police he had sent the man to seek treatment. The suspect confirmed that he had been ordered by one of the city’s Rabbis to seek treatment at the “Shalom Banechah” organization and to write an apology letter to the victim.

 

In May 2014, the suspect attacked a seven-year-old girl in Bnei Brak. The girl was walking home when the suspect saw her and began to follow her. The girl went up to her third-floor apartment to find the house empty. She walked down the stairs, where the suspect waiting for her. He asked her name, told her that she smelled nice and inquired about the shampoo that she used. He then took her behind the building and abused her, and told her not to tell anyone before fleeing. The girl’s mother told investigators that she had seen the man leaving the building. The father successfully identified the man, confronted him, and told him to seek treatment. The suspect said that he then approached a Rabbi in the city who ordered him to start drug therapy, which was confirmed by medical documents. When the case reached police years later, the Rabbi gave testimony which was crucial to the indictment.

 

Four days later, the man abused another six-year-old girl outside her apartment building, after which he dressed her and gave her a one shekel coin as a reparation. DNA taken from the girl’s clothes confirmed the man’s identity, and her parents told investigators that the girl had told them immediately about the attack, and had shown them the coin.

 

The last attack took place in 2018. A girl and her younger sister were waiting for their mother at the entrance to their building when the man approached the older sister and told her she was sweet. He then began abusing her, but she cried loudly and resisted being undressed. When the man heard the girl’s mother coming down the stairs, he told the girl he was sorry and ran away. The mother found security footage of the man, from which her daughters were able to identify him. A family member of the suspect also confirmed his identity from the footage and told investigators that he had indeed been in Bnei Brak at the time of the attack. The suspect also confessed to the last allegations.

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